The Classic Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

The Classic Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

Over 2,000 years ago, many travelers wrote and shared about the incredible sites throughout their journeys. Over time, and with much heated debate, seven of those places made history as the “Seven Wonders of the Ancient World” 

Great Pyramid of Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Temple of Artemis, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, Colossus of Rhodes, and the Lighthouse of Alexandria.

1. THE GREAT PYRAMID OF GIZA, EGYPT

Great Pyramid Giza Last Seven Wonders

The Great Pyramid of Giza
Built around 2600 B.C.
The last standing Ancient Wonder, The Great Pyramid of Giza was the oldest and tallest building in the world for over 4,000 years. In fact, it took modern man until the 19th century to build a taller structure. The Pyramids were built as royal tombs (without the use of modern machinery) for Egyptian pharaohs as their final resting place.

2. HANGING GARDENS OF BABYLON, IRAQ

Hanging Gardens of Babylon - Original Seven Wonders of the World
By DanceLilSister via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon
Built around 600 B.C.
Legend has it that this garden paradise was planted as high as 75 feet in the air on tall stone columns. Some writers described being able to walk underneath the beautiful gardens suspended in the sky.

While there are multiple accounts of the gardens in both Greek and Roman literature, modern scientist question the irrigation system needed to carry water many feet into the air. Since none of found writings of the garden were from firsthand experiences, nor was the location ever found, many experts believe the gardens were apart of fictional fairy tales.

3. TEMPLE OF ARTEMIS AT EPHESUS, TURKEY

Classic Seven Wonders Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
By Zee Prime via cs.wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Built around 550 B.C. and 350 B.C
A series of altars and temples was destroyed and then restored on the same site in Ephesus, modern-day Turkey.

According to legend, the temples burned on July 21, 356 B.C. the night that Alexander the Great was born. Six year later, the construction of new temples begun which was said to have been a 400-foot-long terrace on top of marble steps and surrounded by 127 60-foot marble columns with a statue of Artemis inside. Archeologists disagree as to whether the building had an open-air ceiling or was topped with wood tiles.

The Temple of Artemis was built to honor Artemis, the Greek gooddest of the hunt.

4. STATUE OF ZEUS AT OLYMPIA, GREECE

Built around Fifth Century B.C.
This 40-foot (12-meter) statue depicted the king of the Greek gods – Zeus, the god of thunder. The bare-chested god seated on top of his sphinx-held throne was richly decorated with gold and ivory.

Legend has it that after the statue was finished, Phidias, the sculptor, ask for a sign of approval in which Zeus struck the temple with lighting.

The Zeus statue stood tall in the temple at Olympia for more than eight centuries before Christian priests persuaded the Roman emperor to close the temple in the fourth century A.D. At that time, the statue was removed and destroyed in a fire in the year 462 B.C.

World's Seven Wonders Statue of Zeus

Classic Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

The Classic Seven Wonders of the Ancient World is a testament to the vision and hard work of which human beings are capable of.

Classic Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

The Classic Seven Wonders of the Ancient World is a testament to the vision and hard work of which human beings are capable of.

5. MAUSOLEUM AT HALICARNASSUS, TURKEY

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus
Build: Fourth century B.C.
This elaborate tomb was built to hold the remains of the Persian King Mausollos and his wife, Artemisia. At 135 feet high, this multi-layered building held numerous statues and decorated columns.

The first layer was a 60-foot base of steps decorated with statues, depicting scenes of hunting and other sacrificial scenes. The middle layer held 36 Ionic columns and a stepped, pyramid-shaped roof. At the very top of the roof lay the tomb along with a 20-foot marble rendition of a four-horse chariot.

Multiple earthquakes ultimately led to the destruction of the tomb in the 14th century.

6. COLOSSUS OF RHODES, AN ISLAND IN THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA

Colossus of Rhode Seven Wonders of Ancient World

Colossus of Rhodes
Built around 280 B.C.

The Colossus was an enormous 110-foot (33.5-meter) bronze sculpture of the Greek sun god Helios was the tallest of the ancient world. It stood for 54 years after its completion until it was toppled in an earthquake in 226 B.C. It was never rebuilt and remains sold by the Arabs, who invaded Rhodes hundreds of years later.

7. LIGHTHOUSE OF ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT

Lighthouse of Alexandria Ancient Seven Wonders
By Paul K via Flickr CC BY 2.0

Lighthouse of Alexandria
Built around 270 B.C.
The world’s first lighthouse used mirrors to reflect sunlight for miles out to sea.
Archeologists have found ancient coins on which the lighthouse was depicted, and from them deduced that the structure had three tiers: a square level at the bottom, an octagonal level in the middle and a cylindrical top. Above that stood a 16-foot statue, most likely of Ptolemy II or Alexander the Great, for whom the city was named.

2017-06-15T22:18:18+00:00 Categories: Travel Inspirations|Tags: |

Leave A Comment